Ask the Alchemist #241

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Ask the Alchemist #241

I have heard about caramelized white chocolate and it sounds like an easy thing to accomplish at home.  Have you tried this, and if so what procedure do you recommend?

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Roasting Seminar and Free Shipping

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Roasting Seminar and Free Shipping

It feels like this year is picking up speed already and it is barely out of January and my list of things I want to share is growing.

Roasting Seminar

Let's start off with the next Profile Roasting Seminar.  It is March 19, 2018 and is an in depth, hands on seminar on profile drum roasting.  You don't have to be professional chocolate maker to attend.  There are 12 available spaces open.  Wouldn't you love to learn on this beauty?

In May I will be attending and offering another Roasting Seminar in Sao Paulo Brazil, May 6 during a Bean to Bar festival.  More information to follow should to want to come down.

Free Shipping

I am trying out a limited free shipping offer.  It is actually the same one I offered back during the holidays and I am trying it out for February.  If it turns out to be relatively hassle free on both sides (yours and mine) then they may stay around.  Here are the details:
 
I know Amazon can do this thing all the time and everyone expects its but as a small business owner I can't.  For me it's kind of a big deal.  Here is what I CAN do.  If you fill any USPS Flat rate package with cocoa beans, cocoa nibs or Brewing cocoa, I'll pick up the shipping in the USA.

That means:

  •     8 lbs into a USPS Medium Flat Rate Box
  •     12 lbs into a USPS Large Flat Rate Box


Here are the codes.  If you click the link in each one you don't even have to remember the code (assuming you know how much you want to order), it will be automatically applied (aren't we getting fancy!) to your cart and checkout if you fulfill the requirements.

    USPS Medium Flat Rate Box 8 lbs. 8lbsfreeshipping or this link
    USPS Large Flat Rate Box 12 lbs. 12lbsfreeshipping or this link.


A few details.

  •     This is for the Retail Store only.
  •     You can use them as many times as you like.
  •     The 2 lb Flat rate envelopes are not included this go around.
  •     I cannot get the Testing and Evaluation beans to work due to technical details of the price coding. Sorry.
  •     In a few select cases you may find you can put less than the amount into your boxes (7 lbs into a Medium box for instance) and the code will work.  Please do me the honor and courtesy of going with the spirit of the offer and filling the box and not gaming the system.  I would really appreciate it. Thanks.
  •     Please don't include anything except cocoa beans, cocoa nibs or brewing cocoa (in any combination) in the order.
  •  A couple new beans should be up later in the week.  Also, the ultra cinnamon spice/fruit cake Direct Trade Nigeria is nearly gone, and I don't expect the next crop to have the same profile, so get it before it is gone.   Just look at that chocolate level!

Other Stuff

Finally, this is a shameless plug for our new turnkey-you-only-need-a-melanger Chocolate Making kits. The feedback has been heartwarming and universally positive one them.  There is time enough if you want to make one a Valentine's Day Gift.
 

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Ask the Alchemist #238

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Ask the Alchemist #238

I have been going over your Excel spreadsheet formulator, and the formulator depends on using cocoa liqueur, not nibs. Also, I would also like to use Allulose instead of granulated sugar. Is there a way to "tweak" the formulator to:

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Ask the Alchemist #237

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Ask the Alchemist #237

Level: Novice

Reading Time: 12 minutes

I just read Dandelion’s new book and chocolate making seems very expensive.  Isn’t there some other way make chocolate without a melanger.  Wouldn’t a high powered vitamix work?  How about the Champion juicer?  Can’t I just run the sugar through there?  It all seems so complicated.  There should be a simpler way.  I can roast coffee in a $10 popcorn air popper.  Can I crack the beans In a corona mill and won’t that make chocolate?

Some of you long time readers might be a little confused with why I would answer these series of question when it seems really old news.  The alternative was “What happens if you dip a cat in chocolate?” and well……

I have seen a large resurgence in these kinds of questions in the last couple months.  New chocolate makers are coming in droves (of which I am thrilled by) and with it people seem to be trying to reinvent the proverbial wheel. 

I in no way want to stifle questions, inquisitiveness and innovation but I also really want people to do a little research and maybe realize that nearly all of these questions have been asked before and answered (mostly with a 'no').

I want people to make chocolate.    Keep that in mind.  So ask yourself this.  If there was a cheaper, simpler way to make chocolate, don’t you think I would be the first to announce it to the world?   Really, I’m not ‘Da Man’ trying to keep secrets hidden.  I've built Chocolate Alchemy on the philosophy that there are no secrets and I want to spread all I know.

I guess this is going to turn into a little review of bean to bar history interspersed with some of the questions.  Let’s take it from the top down, going through each step of the process.

 “You are selling beans from 2015.  Aren’t they too old by now?”

I only sell beans that I’ve personally tested and verified.  I make chocolate regularly and pull beans from our stocks once their flavor profile degrades.  In some cases that is 1 year but many (most really) times it can be 2-3 years. 

“Isn’t Criollo the best?”

They are just the rarest and generally the most mild.  I hold by the stance there is no 'best', just your own personal favorite.

“Can I use an air popper like coffee to roast nibs?”

See the above discussion.  I tried it and for a multitude of reasons it didn’t work.  Mostly it has to do with scale and control.

“Won’t a coffee roaster burn my cocoa?”

No, you can turn it down.  

“Will my chocolate taste like coffee if I use my coffee roaster?”

No, I have done it for years.  Any coffee oils that might cross contaminate the cocoa would be absorbed by the husk which you winnow away.  I’ve never even see that happen and I’ve used the same roaster for years.

“Can I use a home brewing mill to crack my cocoa?”

No, the gap (even adjustable ones) is too small.

“Have you heard of the Crankandstein cocoa mill?  Why don’t you offer it?”

You could say I’ve heard of it.  I invented it and had it built by Crankandstein.  I no longer offer it as I find the Champion juicer does a better job for a similar price.  Plus the Champion is multi-purpose.  You can also make liquor with it.

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“Doesn’t the Champion get to hot and destroy all the flavor of the chocolate?  It seems like it would burn it”.

I discovered using the Champion Juicer for chocolate way back in 2004 and built Chocolate Alchemy and got this whole bean to bar movement going with it.  If it had burned the chocolate or made it inferior I simply can’t imagine we would be where we are today.    Yes, the chocolate gets warm, and even hot, but stays WAY cooler than when you roast.    No, it does not harm the chocolate.

“Can I use the Champion 4000?”

I’ve not personally used one, but hear it works ok, but not as good as the 2000 I offer.  And while I am talking about the Champion, there is a Commercial version but I have not found any difference in performance or longevity compared to the Household model, so I offer the less expensive household model.

“Do I have to use a melanger?  It is so expensive.  Can I use……”

I cut that off because of all the variations.  You can insert Vitamix, blender, grain mill, and any other of standard household appliance and I will answer that I tried out every one of them over the years and would have told you if they worked.  As it is, I specifically outline a bunch HERE that do not work.  Again, I WANT  you to make chocolate.  If I could lower the financial bar, what possible reason would I have for not doing that?  The answer is none.

I’m going to take this opportunity and say I appreciate that this is not an inexpensive hobby.  But when I started down this chocolate making at home road in 2004, before there was a bean to bar movement, it was not even possible to make chocolate at home.  Aside from no knowledge base, all the equipment was industrial.  There were no melangers.  The cheapest winnower was $2000 and did a huge 2 oz a minute.  There were no roasters.  A basic set up would have cost you $100,000 or more.  Now a good setup is $1000.  That is two orders of magnitude.  Please keep that in mind is all I’m saying.

“I’ve read that melangers make inferior chocolate and that you need a mill and conche to make good chocolate.”

The WHOLE bean to bar movement was built on the stunning results of stone melangers.  I think that evidence right there speaks for itself as an answer to that question.

“Why don’t you invent a small $100 melanger?  I’m sure you would get a lot more people into chocolate making.”

I bet Apple would sell a lot more Iphone X if they were $50 too.  I would have done it if I thought it was possible but there is a lower limit to material and building costs.   And really it comes down to scale in this case.  Although there are 1000s of melangers out there, I would bet there are millions of iphone Xs already out there.  If I made 100,000 small melangers I could probably do it for under $100 each but there is that small issue of the $10,000,000 needed to do that.  As big as the bean to bar movement gets, I don’t see it ever being worthwhile to make 100,000 melangers at one go. 

“I’ve heard you can’t use a tempering machine with bean to bar chocolate, that it is too thick.  How do you temper?”

I am baffled where that opinion came from.  You can.  Certain extra light roasts that retain moisture might be a bit thicker, and some makers don’t like using cocoa butter (which makes for a more fluid chocolate), which I don’t understand, but you absolutely can use a tempering machine.  That said, they are expensive and I don’t see a reason not to hand temper or to use Silk which is nearly fool proof.

That is a selection of questions that have come in the last couple months.   I said at the beginning I wanted to give you a basic history of bean to bar.  Dandelion’s book showed the successes very well, but what they didn’t describe (nor was it their place to) was the multitude of failures I went through.  It would be impossible for me to tell you everything I tried but know that if it was a common household item, I tried it and if you don’t see it as an option, it is because it failed.  And when I say failed I mean were too expensive, too DIY, too cumbersome, too hard to work with or literally just failed.  

What are some of those things that didn’t work ?

  • Ice cream maker (conche)
  • Rock tumbler (refiner/conche)
  • Air popper (roasting)
  • Ball bearings in mixer (ball mill refiner – expensive)
  • Rolling pin (cracker)
  • Mortar and pestle (well, becaue)
  • Hand peeling (too hard)
  • Corona type mill (poor results)
  • Champion Juicer (refining sugar – fail)
  • Champion Juicer (winnowing  - hard on machine and tasted bad)
  • Vita-Mix (burned the chocolate)
  • Other Juicers (ride up and fail)
  • Home convection ovens (under powered)
  • Meat Grinders (crackers and refiner)
  • Food processors (refiner)
  • Grain mills (cracker and refiner)
  • Coffee grinders (refiner)
  • Indian Wet Grinder (burned out, but we modified them to the Melanger you now know)

And that is just a sampling.  Various other Rube Goldberg type contraptions were tried and there were many variations of those above.  All that and more brought us to this place at this time where the web is full of free information on how you can get into chocolate making for the barest fraction of what it would have cost 20 years ago. 

By all means keep trying though….but maybe not the same things others have tried and proved doesn’t work. There is that semi-urban myth that the definition of crazy is doing the same thing over and over expecting a different result.  Try not to be crazy.

 Just like they say there are no new ideas for story lines anymore, I am pretty confident there are no longer any obvious solutions for making chocolate simpler and significantly less expensive than there currently is.

Regardless, keep experimenting, making and asking questions.

Cheers.

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Ask the Alchemist #236

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Ask the Alchemist #236

I have some of Criollo beans that have the most intense apple smell but no matter how light I roast it I can’t keep it in the chocolate.  How do I keep that flavor in my chocolate?

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Ask the Alchemist #233

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Ask the Alchemist #233

I’ve read all your posts about profile roasting but I’m still not sure where to start.  Can you give me just a basic profile that will work for all beans?

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Ask the Alchemist #230

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Ask the Alchemist #230

I make a 75% dark chocolate using cocoa nibs, cocoa butter and coconut sugar. It's very nice but I would like to make a lower % chocolate for my customers who prefer a less intense chocolate experience

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Ask the Alchemist #229

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Ask the Alchemist #229

This week I want to review and put in one place how time relates to chocolate making.  What you are going to see again is that there is a range, and there is no cut and dry X length of time it takes to make chocolate from the bean.

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